Mark Stoneman

Independent Historian / Freelance Editor and Translator

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Tag: U.S. Civil War

  • Preliminary thoughts on war and gender in the 19th century: revolution, conscription, volunteers, professional war planning, and atrocities.

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    War, Gender, and Nation in 19th-Century Europe: A Preliminary Sketch
  • I study European history, so why did I post about Sand Creek earlier today? And why excerpt seemingly gratuitous violence? I have no expertise in U.S. history, but I am interested in the history of violence per se, which can reveal a lot about peoples and cultures at a given…

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  • Quotation and link to an article by Ned Blackhawk on the 150th anniversary of this atrocity.

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  • There is an interesting article in yesterday’s New York Times about how Texas is changing the content of its American high school history textbooks. Instead of taking potshots at its clear abuses of history, however, the author locates it in a broader context of history curricula and identity politics over…

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  • Kevin Levin of Civil War Memory has posted good material to his academic blog under the category, myth of black Confederates. Several recent posts include criticism of efforts by modern-day Confederate patriots and would-be historians who want to appropriate Weary Clyburn, a slave, as a defender of Southern liberty. In…

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  • This following post originally appeared on my old history blog, Clio and Me, on this date. I was looking through Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s The Physicists, a play I have used a few times in a survey course on modern Europe. In the back of the English translation by James Kirkup are…

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    Paradoxes